1 ... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 20

III. 4. Judicial decisions - Natália dvornyicsenkó

bet10/20
Sana15.06.2018
Hajmi5.01 Kb.

III. 4. Judicial decisions 


Judicial decisions are considered to be auxiliary means of interpretation of international 
law in continental law, in comparison with treaties, custom and general principles. The courts
732
 
fall into the category of primary sources of diplomatic law in common law. (It should be added 
here that the speedy transformations of both our life and the systems and institutions that form 
us are “game changers for the grammar of modern law”.)
733
 
The  International  Court  of  Justice  in  The  Hague
734
  is  responsible  for  many  relevant 
important decisions.
735
 In addition, the European Court of Justice of the European Union can 
be considered as a major source of European law. Mann finds that although from the legal point 
of view foreign affairs are „mere facts”, they may bring certain legal rules into operation, for 
example declaration of  war means  that trading  rules with  the enemy become applicable, the 
recognition of a person as a diplomat will confer immunity from legal process upon him, or the 
termination  of  an  extradition  treaty  may  result  in  an  accused  person  avoiding  prosecution 
abroad. Furthermore, as noted by Merrills, the difficulty of bringing cases before international 
                                                 
727
 Bowring op. cit. 208. 
728
 Attila Badó–Mátyás Bence: Reforming the Hungarian Lay Justice System. In: Péter Cserne–István H. Szilágyi–
Miklós  Könczöl–Máté  Paksy–Péter  Takács-Szilárd  Tattay  (eds.):  Theatrvm  legale  mvndi.  Symbola  Cs.  Varga 
oblata. Szent István Társulat. Budapest, 2007, 12. 
729
 According to the negative opinions about globalization, “We can now posit a fourth generation of rights: rights 
that justify military intervention in the name of humanity.” Adam Gearey: Globalization and Law: Trade, Rights, 
War. Rowman&Littlefield Publishers, Inc. Lanham, 2005, 14. 
730
 Sharp–Wiseman op. cit. 277. 
731
 Dame Hazel Genn–Martin Partington–Sally Wheeler: Law in the real world: improving our understanding of 
how law works. The Nuffield Foundation. London, 2006, iii. 
732
 Lauterpacht notes that the traditional doctrine of separation of powers is no longer an axiomatic principle: courts 
perform administrative functions and by judicial law-making intrude ont he domain of the legislative power. At 
the  same  time,  administrative  organs  are  being  entrusted  with  judicial  functions,  having  assumed  in  practice 
legislative powers. H. Lauterpacht: The Function of Law in the International Community. Archon Books. Hamden, 
1966, 389.  
733
 Mireille Hilderbrandt: Law as Information in the Era of Data-Driven Agency. The Modern Law Review. Vol. 
79, No. 1. January 2016, 2. 
734
 The tradition of The Hague as „judicial capital” goes back to the peace conferences.   
735
 The judicial machinery could be used for settling any international dispute without force, but states can not be 
brought before a court against their will, nor made to abide by its judgement. Karl W. Deutsch (co-author): From 
Political Community and the North Atlantic Area. Princeton University Press. Princeton, 1957, 5. 

 
118 
courts
736
  “throws  into  prominence”  the  role  of  municipal  courts,  played  in  application  of 
international law. Municipal courts lack the authority and prestige of international courts, yet, 
they decide questions of international law much more frequently, than is generally realized. For 
example, questions of diplomatic immunity are decided almost exclusively by municipal courts, 
especially in Great Britain. (The related contribution, municipal courts can make, has certain 
limitations – in the absence of any doctrine of international stare decisis, municipal courts often 
differ on the interpretation of international law.)
737
 
On  the  other  hand,  the  conduct  of  foreign  affairs  can  not  generally  serve  as  the 
foundation  of  a  legal  rule  or  contribute  to  the  formation  of  public  policy.  In  the  twentieth 
century there were very few cases of recognition of states, since many of decisions related to 
recognition of governments. A large number of cases of that era, decided by the courts, involved 
the question whether a particular body of persons constituted the government of a recognized 
state.  Furthermore,  all  the  numerous  decisions  in  the  Western  world,  related  to  the  Russian 
revolution, were concerned with this question.
738
 The case of Bakhmeteff in 1917, is a historical 
example, which illustrates how a revolutionary change in the form of government  that results 
in  the  termination  or  suspension  of  a  diplomatic  mission,  turns  to  be  a  perplexing  situation, 
relating  to  a  diplomat’s  status  in  the  receiving  state.  The  presented  case  was  addressed 
according to standards of customary international law. Boris Bakhmeteff was an Ambassador, 
representing  the  Russian  government  in  Washington,  namely  the  Kerensky  régime,  which 
existed  for  a  few  months  only,  until  it  was  overthrown  in  October  1917.  This  revolutionary 
event  was  followed  by  a  period  of  uncertainty  in  Washington.  The  United  States  had  found 
themselves in an awkward position regarding Bakhmeteff’s status. Nevertheless, the American 
authorities did not suspend the official intercourse with the Ambassador. The situation cleared 
with the establishment of the Russian Soviet Republic in  November 1917. By Hershey, who 
found this case “strange”,
739
 as long as the American Government continued to recognize the 
Ambassador, he was entitled to diplomatic privileges and immunities, at least by custom and 
courtesy.
740
 Sometime later, the perplexing situation over the change in the Russian government 
and recognition of the successor of the Provisional Government of Russia, resulted in a suit at 
                                                 
736
  In  conflict  resolution,  there  is  no  general  obligation  to  exhaust  negotiations  or  any  other  diplomatic  means 
before  instituting  proceedings.  Laurence  Boisson  de  Chazournes–Marcelo  G.  Kohen–Jorge  E.  Viñuales  (eds.): 
Diplomatic and Judicial Means of Dispute Settlement. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. Leiden, 2013, 23.   
737
 Merrills op. cit. 24-25. 
738
 Mann op. cit. 8-42. 
739
  Amos  S.  Hershey:  The  Status  of  Mr.  Bakhmeteff,  The  Russian  Ambassador  in  Washington.  The  American 
Journal of International Law. Vol. 16, No 3, 1922, 426. 
740
 Hershey op. cit. 426-428. 

 
119 
law,  where  the  main  question  was  over  recovery  of  the  private  deposit  of  the  Russian 
Government with the New York bank, due to the occurrence of the new assignment, made by 
the Russian Soviet Government to the United States of the right of the new Russian Government 
to the bank account. The bank account in question was opened in 1916 by the Imperial Russian 
Government  and  despite  of  the  fact  that  the  Soviet  Government  dismissed  Bakhmeteff  as 
Ambassador in 1917, the United States continued to recognize him as Ambassador until 1922. 
After the retirement of Bakhmeteff as Ambassador, the United States continued to recognize 
him as custodian of Russian property in the United States. From 1917 to 1933, the United States 
declined to recognize the Soviet Government or to receive its accredited representative and so 
certified in litigations pending in the federal courts. In 1933, the United States recognized the 
Soviet Government and took from it an assignment of all amounts admitted to be due that may 
be  found  to  be  due,  as  the  successor  of  prior  Governments  of  Russia,  or  otherwise,  from 
American nationals, including corporations. The Court found that “What government is to be 
regarded here as representative of a foreign sovereign state is a political rather than a judicial 
question,  and  is  to  be  determined  by  the  political  department  of  the  government.”,  having 
concluded  that  “…  the  recognition  of  the  Soviet  Government  left  unaffected  those  legal 
consequences  of  the  previous  recognition  of  the  Provisional  Government  and  its 
representatives, which attached to  action taken  here prior to the later recognition.”  In this 
situation, the case was reminded to the Court of Appeals for further proceedings.
741
 
In Fenton Textile Association v. Krassin
742
 in 1921, the Court of Appeal held that Leonid 
Krassin,
743
 the official agent of the Soviet Union, under the Anglo-Soviet Trade Agreement of 
16  March  1921,  was  not  entitled  to  immunity  from  civil  process.  Lord  Curzon,  the  Foreign 
Secretary of Great Britain certified in this case that under the common law, Krassin was not a 
diplomat. Due to the fact that the Soviet Government had not been recognized de jure as a state 
at that time, no representative of the Soviet Government would be received by His Majesty’s 
Government.  
In  De  Fallois  v.  Piatakoff,  et  al.,  and  Commercial  Delegation  of  the  U.S.S.R.  in 
France
744
 in 1935, the French Court of Appeal (Cour de Cassation) declared itself incompetent 
to recognize of a proceeding for swindling, in connection to the defendants – Piatakoff, Breslau 
                                                 
741
 Guaranty Trust Co. of New York v. United States. 304 U.S. 126 (58 S.Ct. 785, 82 L.Ed. 1224). 
742
 Fenton Textile Association v. Krassin. 38 T. L. R. 259. (1921). 
743
  Krassin  served  at  the  Government  of  the  Soviet  Union  as  People's  Commisar  for  Trade  and  Indistry  from 
November  1918  until  June  1920,  then  as  People's  Commisar  for  Foreign  Trade  from  6  July,  1923  until  18 
November, 1925. 
744
 De Fallois v. Piatakoff, et al., and Commercial Delegation of the U.S.S.R. in France, French Court of Cassation, 
26 February, 1935, Paris. 

 
120 
and Lamosky, respectively chief and chief assistants at the Soviet Commercial Delegation in 
France. The Commercial Delegation existed first as a commercial institution (not being able to 
share  the  sovereignty  of  the  Soviet  State),  but  after  the  Franco-Soviet  agreement  as  of  11 
January, 1934, these three persons became members of the Soviet Embassy in France, enjoying 
diplomatic immunity from that point.  
 
A similar case of correlation of state succession and diplomatic immunity occured in 
1994, in the case of Former Syrian Ambassador to the German Democratic Republic,
745
 when 
S., the former Ambassador of Syria to the German Democratic Republic was charged of having 
assisted in the commission of murder and the bringing about a bomb explosion in West Berlin, 
the territory of the Federal Republic of Germany in 1983. The German Federal Constitutional 
Court found that S. rightfully had been denied diplomatic immunity by the Berlin courts – only 
the  German  Democratic  Republic,  as  the  receiving  state,  and  not  the  Federal  Republic  of 
Germany,  as  a  “third  state”,  was  obliged  to  respect  the  existing  immunity  of  a  diplomat, 
regarding  to  acts,  performed  in  the  exercise  of  his  official  functions.  (When  the  German 
Democratic Republic joined the Federal Republic of Germany in 1990, it ceased to exist as a 
sovereign  state,  consequently,  its  diplomatic  relations  ended,  too.)  The  Vienna  Convention 
prescribes that diplomatic immunity for official acts continues to exist after the termination of 
the diplomat’s assignment. Consequently, the official acts of diplomats are attributable to the 
sending state. Thus, the judicial proceedings against diplomats or former diplomats come, in 
their effects, close to proceeding against the sending state – continuing diplomatic immunity 
for official acts serves to protect the sending state itself, as concluded by O’Keefe. In a sum, 
the complainant acted in the exercise of his official functions as a member of the diplomatic 
mission,  within  the  scope  of  the  Vienna  Convention,
746
  because  he  was  charged  with  an 
omission that was within the scope of his responsibility as Ambassador, and which is to that 
extent was attributable to the sending state.
747
 
In  1980,  two  Iraqi  diplomats,  accredited  to  the  Government  of  German  Democratic 
Republic in East Berlin, were arrested by the police of West Berlin for delivery of explosives 
to a person who planned a bomb attack in West Berlin. The case was decided by the Senate of 
                                                 
745
 Former Syrian Ambassador to the German Democratic Republic, 115 ILR 595, 605, 1997. 
746
 Ibid. 
747
  Roger  O’Keefe:  “Immunity  Ratione  Materiae  from  Foreign  Criminal  Jurisdiction  and  the  Concept  of  ‘Acts 
Performed in an Official Capacity’.” Report, given at “Immunity ratione materiae of state officials from foreign 
criminal jurisdiction.” Material of the seminar, held on 21 March, 2014 in Strasbourg, 6. 

 
121 
West Berlin, as a result of which the two diplomats were expelled.
748
 The deportation of the 
Iraqi diplomats in September 1980 was attributed to reasons of security and foreign policy.
749
 
On the topic of controversies, related to purchase or rent of property to foreign embassies, in 
Agbor v. Metropolitan Police Commissioner,
750
 the Metropolitan Police acted, following the 
norms of diplomatic privileges, regarding the provisions of the Vienna Convention, relying on 
which proved to be a mistake in this case. Mrs. Agbor, together with her family moved into the 
flat,  previously  occupied  by  a  diplomatic  attaché  of  the  Nigerian  Federal  Government  in 
London. The Nigerian High Commissioner refused to test in the courts the right of Mrs. Agbor 
to occupy the flat and invoked the assistance of H. M. Government, referring to the provisions 
of the Vienna Convention,
751
 resulted in the eviction of Mrs. Agbor and her family. Eventually, 
the Court of Appeal finally ordered the defendant to restore Mrs. Agbor’s possession of the flat, 
on the ground that the High Commissioner was not entitled to invoke the Vienna Convention 
in that case. The flat in question was not the“private residence of a diplomatic agent”, since 
the attaché had finally left the premises. Consequently, neither the High Commissioner, nor the 
Metropolitan Police had the right to cite the Vienna Convention.   
In  1997,  the  Israeli  president  held  that  a  rental  agreement  was  a  contract  subject  to 
application of private law, so not only a state, but a person might engage in such a contract, 
considering that there was no difference between a contract for a purchase of property for use 
by an embassy and a contract for purchase of food for use by an ambassador.
752
 The President’s 
statement referred to the case, heard by the Israeli courts in Her Majesty the Queen in Right of 
Canada v. Sheldon Edelson, when the Canadian Ambassador refused to free his rented home, 
stating that he had an option to extend his lease. When the Ambassador was sued, he claimed 
diplomatic and sovereign immunity. The Magistrates Court, the District Court and the Supreme 
Court disagreed with the claim and ordered the Ambassador’s eviction. The courts found that 
real  estate  transactions  were  of  commercial  character,  therefore  could  not  enjoy  sovereign 
immunity. Besides, the building was used for the Ambassador’s home and not as premises of 
the Canadian Embassy, so the diplomatic immunity could not be raised, in this regard, too.
753
 
By 2010 the “legal battle” between the Embassy of Austria and the legal heirs of Agha 
                                                 
748
 Charles Rousseau: Chronique des faits internationaux. Revue Générale de Droit International Public, 83/351. 
1980, 364.  
749
 Friedo Sachser: Federal Republic of Germany. Domestic Affairs. American Jewish Yearbook. 1982, 205-206. 
750
 Agbor v. Metropolitan Police Commissioner [1969] 2 All E. R. 707. 
751
 Vienna Convention. Article 22(2) and Article 30(1). 
752
 Ruth Levush: Israel: Compensation for Victims of Terrorism. Report for Congress. November 2007. Directorate 
of Legal Research for Foreign, Comparative, and International Law. 2007-00084, 6. 
753
 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada v. Sheldon Edelson et al., 51 PD 625 (1997). 

 
122 
Shahi over property issues had been ongoing for some years already. Legal experts claimed, 
the Government of Austria was in illegal custody of a house – property of a Pakistani national, 
while the Embassy’s lease, started on 25 May, 2006 ended on 4 August, 2009. (The lawyers 
referred to the precedent regarding tenancy laws in the judgment of the Supreme Court of 1981 
in the Qureshi case, when A. M. Qureshi, a Pakistan citizen, after entering into a contract with 
the  U.  S.  S.  R.  and  its  Trade  Representation,  for  supply  of  goods  to  Pakistan  Government, 
claimed breach of the contract on the part of the Soviet Union, and claimed damages.)
754
 The 
Pakistani side found the Austrian Embassy’s conduct unheard of, speaking of the violation of 
the European  Human Rights Convention by the Austrians, by denying an EU citizen, which 
two  of  the  heirs  were,  of  the  right  to  live  in  his  own  home,  actually  illegally  occupying  the 
premises without paying rent since July 2008. The Pakistani court ordered Austria to vacate the 
premises.  The  Austrian  Ambassador  claimed  diplomatic  immunity  and  there  were  voices  to 
declare him persona non grata, according to press. Warrants of eviction had been issued twice 
and  after  bailiffs  visited  to  the  premises,  the  Austrian  side  accused  the  civil  judge  of  bias. 
Finally, the Pakistani court denied the Embassy’s immunity on 17 March, 2010, adhering to the 
fact that the Embassy of Austria became illegal occupant of the demised premises.
755
 
Particular statements or actions of diplomats could be followed by certain consequences, 
when they are, for example, of a political character.
756
 In this way, in 2014 the conduct of André 
Goodfriend, the chargé d’affaires of the American Embassy in Budapest, caused serious tension 
in Hungarian-American diplomatic relations. The United States did not withdraw diplomatic 
immunity  of  Goodfriend,  initiated  by  Péter  Polt,  Attorney  General  and  requested  by  Péter 
Szijjártó, Hungary's Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade from John Kerry, the United States 
Secretary of State, after a public criminal case was launched in Hungary due to “libel, causing 
great  injury  of  interest,  committed  before  the  general  public”  that  Goodfriend  had  been 
involved into.
 
Goodfriend in his statements on state of affairs in Hungary, made statements on 
Ildikó Vida`s, Tax Authority Chairman, implication on corruption.
757
 The investigation of this 
case had been initiated by Civil Unity Forum (CÖF), the rather governmental NGO that filed a 
report „against an unknown perpetrator”, because in opinion of CÖF, under Hungarian law 
                                                 
754
 Qureshi v. USSR. PLD 1981 SC 377. 
755
 Mariana Baabar: Do tenancy laws apply to Austrian embassy? Pakistan Defence. 16 June, 2010. (Accessed on 
14 January, 2016.) http://defence.pk/threads/austrian-embassy-in-a-tenancy-lawsuit.62002/ 
756
 Rózsa claims that information has to some extent an ideological aspect. Görgy Rózsa: Information: from claims 
to needs. Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences-Kultúra Hungarian Foreign Trading Company. Budapest, 
1988, 12. 
757
  Marad  Goodfriend  mentessége...  és  Vida  is.  (Goodfriend’s  immunity  stays…  and  Vida,  too.)  Népszava.  21 
January, 2015. (Accessed on 20 January, 2016.) http://nepszava.hu/cikk/1045910-marad-goodfriend-mentessege-
es-vida-is 

 
123 
corruption was a crime, along with the situation when someone possessed data on corruption 
and failed to report that, and the Americans missed to make this report. With escalation of the 
incident,  the  Hungarian  Government  also  required  concrete  proofs  of  corruption  that 
Goodfriend could not present, due to his diplomatic immunity, which the United States denied 
to waive. By leaving the premises of the American Embassy in Budapest, Goodfriend entered 
the territory of Hungary, thus having obligations, arising under Hungarian law, which in this 
case – the obligation of giving the alleged evidence of the fact of corruption to the Hungarian 
authorities  that  would  also  explain  why  entry  of  six  Hungarian  was  denied  to  the  United 
States.
758
 (In October 2014, András Simonyi, Hungary's former Ambassador in Washington, 
called this incident in a TV programme a „nuclear diplomatic bomb”.)
759
 Goodfriend reacted 
to this situation on Twitter by “History of diplomacy & int'l relations & rationale for the Vienna 
Convention http://goo.gl/GHiqgy
760
 always makes good reading.”
761 
 Eventually, Goodfriend, 
replaced  by  Coleen  Bell,  the  new  U.  S.  Ambassador  to  Hungary,  left  the  country  in  2015, 
referring to family reasons,
762
 and the investigation was terminated.
763
 Ádány notes regarding 
the case that the current regulatory environment is not suitable to consider similar cases in the 
future, due to lack of practical consequences of other distinctions, related to exemptions, under 
diplomatic and international law.
764
 
States  have  always  had  to  take  into  account  the  requirements  of  membership  of  the 
international  society.  The  principles  of  sovereignty,  inviolability  and  non-interference  in  the 
domestic affairs of other countries are the foundations upon which the international state system 
is built. In this course, the wider duties of states include cooperation with other states, whenever 
                                                 
758
 Feljelentést tesznek a békemenetesek az USA ügyvivője miatt. (The organizers of  peace march file a report 
because  of  the  U.  S.  chargé  d’affairs.)  HVG.  13  November,  2014.

  

(Accessed  on  20  January, 
2016.) http://hvg.hu/itthon/20141113_Feljelentest_tesznek_a_bekemenetesek_az_U 
759
 András Simonyi: Nukleáris diplomáciai bomba a kitiltási ügy. (András Simonyi: the expulsion case is a nuclear 
diplomatic 
bomb.) 
HVG. 
20 
October, 
2014. 
(Accessed 
on 
20 
January, 
2016.) 
http://hvg.hu/itthon/20141020_simonyi_nuklearis_diplomaciai_bomba 
760
 The entry, made on 13 November, 2014, contained reference to the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations 
of 1961: “http://legal.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/9_1_1961.pdf”. 
761
 Visszavágott az USA ügyvivője a feljelentéssel fenyegetőző CÖF-nek. (The U. S. charge d'affaires has hit back 
to  COF,  which  is  threatening  of  denunciation.)  HVG.  13  November  2014. (Accessed  on  20  January,  2016.) 
http://hvg.hu/itthon/20141113_Visszavagott_az_USA_ugyvivoje_a_feljelent 
762
 Goodfriend és a hazai belpolitika. (Goodfriend and the domestic internal affairs.) Magyar Nemzet. 8 December, 
2014.  (Accessed  on  20  January,  2016.)  http://mno.hu/magyar_nemzet_belfoldi_hirei/goodfriend-es-a-hazai-
belpolitika-1262169 
763
 Távozik André Goodfriend. (André Goodfriend is leaving.) Magyar Nemzet. 11 February, 2015. (Accessed on 
20 January, 2016.) http://mno.hu/magyar_nemzet_belfoldi_hirei/lezarult-a-nav-vizsgalat-1275685 
764
  Tamás  Vince  Ádány:  Megjegyzések  a  diplomaták  személyes  mentességeiről  a  Goodfriend  ügy  margójára. 
(Notes on personal immunities of diplomats on the subject of the Goodfriend case.) Pázmány Law Working Papers. 
2015/10, 14. 

 
124 
it  is  possible,  obedience  to  international  law
765
  –  particularly  the  principle  of  pacta  sunt 
servanda, and abstention from (forcible) intervention in the affairs of others.
766
  
There are instances when an ambassador, who finds himself aggrieved over a promotion 
or  other  matters,  takes  remedy  to  judicial  appeal,  in  consonance  with  the  procedures  of  the 
related  state.  For  example,  most  of  such  cases  in  India  go  at  first  to  a  Civil  Administrative 
Tribunal.  Subsequent  appeal  is  possible  to  high  courts  and  the  Supreme  Court.  The  foreign 
ministries are customarily exert their utmost to keep personnel cases out of the public domain, 
habitually pursuing a compromise to avoid legal disputes.
767
 
In most of the peaceful  states,  where there is  rule of law, privileges  and  immunities, 
granted to diplomats, might be viewed as senseless and unnecessary to the extent that they can 
cause resentment of the citizens of the host country. Under exceptional circumstances and in 
some  countries,  only  official  recognition  of  mutually  applicable  privileges  and  immunities 
provides an opportunity to maintain diplomatic relations.
768
 
Watts notes that the most of the law is customary international law, based on general 
practice of states, which is a phenomenon, being imprecise, as source of law, in addition, slow 
in  alteration,  therefore  the  processes  of  transformation  in  international  law  are  imperfect. 
Judicial decisions can barely serve as a proper way for ensuring the methodical change, despite 
of  the  fact  that  when  applying  the  law,  courts  are  able  occasionally  change  it.  The  judicial 
involvement in this respect is unstable, completely depending on the matters states choose to 
put forward for judicial settlement. (Even treaties, as part of the growth of new customary law 
are only able to generate changes slowly.) Accordingly, the international legal system has no 
process that would be able to produce instant and general change in the law. Notwithstanding, 
international  law  does  change,  the  problem  is  in  the  timeliness  and  in  securing  of  the  right 
direction  for  the  change.
769
  In  addition,  a  process  or  symptomatology,  called  globalization, 
named so for lack of a better name, significantly reshapes the legal development.
770
 
The  International  Court  of  Justice  held  that  a  diplomatic  agent,  caught  in  the  act  of 
committing  an  assault  or  other  offence  might,  on  occasion,  could  be  briefly  arrested  by  the 
                                                 
765
 The growing necessity of peaceful cooperation between all nations nowadays has pushed to some extend to the 
backgrpund  the  endless  doctrinal  disputes  concerning  the  basis  of  international  law.  Karol  Wolfke:  Custom  in 
Present International Law. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. Dordrecht, 1993, 172-173. 
766
 Smith–Light op. cit. 3-6. 
767
 Rana: The 21st Century Ambassador… 185. 
768
 Popov op. cit. 4. 
769
 Arthur Watts KCMG QC: The Importance of International law. In: Byers, Michael (ed.): The role of law in 
international politics. Oxford University Press. New York, 2000, 15-16.   
770
 Martonyi op. cit. 79. 

 
125 
police of the receiving state, to prevent the commission of the particular crime.
771
 The ultimate 
sanction, in opinion of the Court would be a “radical remedy” that every receiving state has at 
its own discretion – interruption of diplomatic relations with the sending state and calling for 
the immediate closure of the offending mission.
772
 Thus, the Court considered that severance 
of  diplomatic  relations  and  cancelling  of  advantages  of  diplomatic  status  would  be  the 
punishment for the abuse. 
Over  the  past  years,  the  role  of  judges  has  been  expanding  worldwide,  even  on 
constitutional  and  political  issues.  Judicialization  is  also  the  main  consequence  of  a  new 
cosmopolitan legalism.
773
 The judges have a dominant role in setting policy and taking part in 
all major institutional and social issues.
774
 Joyner asserts that it is important, on the other hand, 
not to overrate judicial decisions and arbitral awards, as sources of international law, for each 
case  is  decided  on  its  own  merits  and  the  decision  affects  only  the  states,  involved  in  each 
particular case.  In addition,  analytical  deductions  can not  obligate national  governments  and 
create  or  codify  international  legal  rules.  Governments  may  adopt  these  interpretations  and 
suggestions on the application of international legal rules to foreign policy.
775
 Akehurst points 
out that many of the rules of international law on topics, such as diplomatic immunity, have 
been  developed  by  judgments  of  national  courts  and  such  judgments  should  be  used  with 
caution. The judges may look as if they applied international law, when in fact they applied 
some  peculiar  rule  of  their  own  national  law.
776
  In  this  way,  the  nature  and  extent  of  the 
inviolability,  granted  to  a  diplomatic  agent  in  transit,  often  defined  by  the  courts  of  these 
countries.  Brown  points  out  that  the  decisions  of  courts  may  not  always  be  welcome,  for 
example, when an accused is released from the jurisdiction, but the courts have the opportunity, 
occasionally, though, to develop clear rules.
777
  
Certain  other  sources  of  international  law,  such  as  the  legal  doctrine  and  general 
principles of law, being recognized in legal systems at international level, may also serve as 
                                                 
771
 International Court of Justice. Reports of judgements, advisory opinions and orders. Case concerning United 
States diplomatic and consular staff in Tehran. (United States of America v. Iran) Judgement of 24 May, 1980, 
para. 41, 86. [Hereinafter: The American Hostages Case.] 
772
 The American Hostages Case. Judgement of 24 May, 1980, para. 85. 
773
 Mario P. Chiti: Judicial and Political Power: Where is the Dividing Line? A Praise for Judicialization and for 
Judicial Restraint. European Public Law. Vol. 21, No. 4. December 2015, 406. 
774
 Chitti op. cit. 719. 
775
  Joyner  shares  the  point  of  view,  according  to  which  this  source,  besides  judicial  decisions  of  national  and 
international courts, also includes teachings and writings of the most highly qualified jurists and publicists. Joyner 
op. cit. 14. 
776
 Malanczuk op. cit. 51. 
777
 Jonathan Brown: Diplomatic Immunity: State Practice under the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations. 
The  International  and  Comparative  Law  Quaterly.  Vol.  37,  No.  1.  January,  1988,  59.  [Hereinafter:  Brown: 
Diplomatic …] 

 
126 
additional sources of diplomatic law. Boyle and Chinkin, speaking of reform of international 
law-making,  note  that  the  international  legal  system  moved  far  beyond  the  traditional 
categorization of the sources  of  international  law in  the Statute of the  International  Court of 
Justice and engendered flexibility in this regard. The new instruments include such techniques 
as opting into (or out) treaty amendments that allow for technical changes, or extention to the 
scope of existing treaties without the need for adoption of formal processes, such as diplomatic 
conferences. A future question that arises is who determines an instrument to be law-making, 
since it is no longer the case that such decisions are made by heads of governments or Ministers 
of  Foreign  Affairs.
778
  (So  far,  scholars  from  different  theoretical  perspectives  have 
acknowledged  the  broad  range  of  participants  in  the  current  processes  of  international  law-
making.)
779
  Lastly,  the  different  sources  of  international  law  are  not  arranged  in  a  fixed 
hierarchical order. In practice, supplementing each other, they are applied side by side. In case 
of a clear conflict, treaties prevail over custom and custom prevails over general principles of 
law and the subsidiary sources.
780
 
Summarizing Chapter III on sources and subject of diplomatic law with regard to the 
examined topic of diplomatic privileges  and immunities, it should be mentioned  here that in 
spite  of  the  high  level  of  codification  concerning  the  legal  sources,  international  law  is  not 
imposed on states in the sense that there is no international legislature. (In addition, according 
to the traditional Western view, international law is founded essentially on consensus.) As to 
enforcement  of  international  law,  besides  the  execution  measures  of  the  United  Nations 
Council, judicial decisions of the International Court of Justice and self-help (self-defense), also 
the  loss  of  legal  rights  and  privileges  is  a  common  enforcement  method,  used  by  states  in 
relation to withdrawal of legal rights and privileges. Typical example of this method is severing 
of diplomatic relations, which may be followed by trade embargos, along with the freezing of 
assets and suspension of treaty rights. The application of the listed measures and even the mere 
threat  of them can prove to  be effective in  enforcing of international  obligations.  Two other 
measures in order to follow international law are reciprocity and public opinion, since states are 
well aware of the fact that their violations of law in regard to other states may be reciprocated, 
and  states  generally  try  to  avoid  criticism  for  failure  concerning  observation  of  the  rules  of 
international law.
781
 
 
                                                 
778
 Boyle–Chinkin op. cit. 35. 
779
 Boyle–Chinkin op. cit. 43. 
780
 Malanczuk op. cit. 57. 
781
 Tim Hillier: Sourcebook on Public International Law. Cavendish Publishing Limited. London, 1998, 30-31.  

 
127 

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


iii-international-103.html

iii-international-108.html

iii-international-112.html

iii-international-117.html

iii-international-121.html